Frequently asked questions

 Not sure what to do? Not sure what we do?
What is TNR? Why do it?
I can't keep my pet. What can I do?
I just found a litter of kittens. What do I do?


TNR is Trap-neuter-release. Feral cats are caught and neutered or spayed, and then released back into their community, where they are familiar and are able to find food and shelter. TNR helps control the feral population and prevents killing animals just because of space. Several county shelters succesfully practice TNR as a means of reducing the number of euthanized animals. Some shelters and rescue groups loan out traps to enable trapping of feral cats. 
If you can't keep your pet, there are options. Check with friends, neighbors, and relatives who might be able to at least provide a temporary home. Post your pet on nextdoor.com and social media. Many vet clinics provide boarding for a fee. County shelters will take surrendered pets for a fee, but some shelters will euthanize animals when they run out of space, so make sure it's a no-kill shelter. Jelly's Place sometimes can board or accept a surrendered pet for a fee, depending on space. Never ever leave your pet outside to fend for itself. 
You might be tempted to pick them up and take them home. Don't touch or move them without first waiting to see if the mom cat will return. Do not disturb the nest and watch from a distance. Mom cats leave their babies to go find food. if they think their babies are no longer safe because people are snooping around, she will move them. It's best to leave food and water nearby but not too close to the nest.  If the mom cat does not return after a couple of hours, it may be time to take the babies. If it is cold or rainy, and the kittens are crying, put them in a box with warm towels right out of the dryer. They will need kitten milk and should be fed KMR or Pet Lac kitten formula by bottle every few hours. Kittens cannot digest regular cow's milk. The guide below has more information on caring for orphaned kittens.